Braniff Building

Location: Oklahoma City, OK
Basic Equipment List: Facade Access System, Tie-backs, Pedestals, Sockets, Davits

Renovations on the 10-story Braniff Building, 324 N Robinson Ave., began in 2011. The original deep red color of the brick was re-exposed after gray paint was removed, and the west facade is being restored while a modern facade is being added to the former alley facade facing east.

The 75,584-square-foot building was designed by architect Andrew Solomon Layton. It was built in 1923 by Thomas Braniff for his insurance agency and was later home to the airline he founded, Braniff Airways, until he moved operations to Dallas in the early 1940s. The building is on the National Register of Historic Places.

Sky Rider is in the process of installing a new façade access system with independent Tie-Back devices, Pedestals, Portable Sockets and Davits. Lifeline Tie-back devices and Pedestals were installed by through-bolting to a structural baseplate that was welded to I beams under the roof slab.

Installation of the through-bolts (B7 high strength treaded rod) required very careful alignment of the Structural baseplate with the template temporarily mounted to the top of the roof slab. Templates were necessary to keep the bolts parallel and in registration for attachment of the Tie-backs and Pedestals. Varying bolt patterns, distances to the structural baseplate, location of re-bar and the slope of the roof all contributed to the complexity of the installation.

Sky Rider has installed thousands of Davit Pedestals and Tie-back devices for both new construction and on existing buildings and structures. While most any fabricator can make these devices for new construction, Sky Rider is particularly skilled and capable of designing, manufacturing and installing devices on existing buildings. Every building is unique and Sky Rider has the capability to adapt to each building’s unique requirements.

The following information highlights some of the installation steps that were required.

Step 1. A template was made to match each structural baseplate. A pilot hole was drilled for alignment of the template.

Step 1. A template was made to match each structural baseplate. A pilot hole was drilled for alignment of the template.

Step 2. Hole locations were marked using the template, then all four holes were drilled from the roof down for insertion of the through bolts.

Step 2. Hole locations were marked using the template, then all four holes were drilled from the roof down for insertion of the through bolts.

Step 3. B7 treaded rods were installed and cut to length. The underside nuts were tack welded to the rod and to the plate.

Step 3. B7 treaded rods were installed and cut to length. The underside nuts were tack welded to the rod and to the plate.

Step 4. Because the roof has a natural slope, all pedestals and tie-back devices were shimmed to keep the posts vertical and the pedestal plate level. Gaps will be filled with high strength grout prior to roofing.

Step 4. Because the roof has a natural slope, all pedestals and tie-back devices were shimmed to keep the posts vertical and the pedestal plate level. Gaps will be filled with high strength grout prior to roofing.

Step 5. With the threaded rods welded in place, the nuts were torqued to the engineer’s specifications. Both Pedestals and Tie-backs appear taller than necessary because of the added thickness of the roofing and insulation that will be installed above the slab.

Step 5. With the threaded rods welded in place, the nuts were torqued to the engineer’s specifications. Both Pedestals and Tie-backs appear taller than necessary because of the added thickness of the roofing and insulation that will be installed above the slab.